Bienvenue sur ce site principalement dédié à la rencontre avec les Libellules de France et d'Ailleurs.
Qui n'a jamais été émerveillé par leur beauté? Recensements, découvertes, discussions, explications et photographies de qualité sont nos objectifs pour vous faire aimer ces robots vivants!
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vos photos ici, lire les
Conditions de Publication
et contacter Noushka ici: noushka321@gmail.com

Welcome to this blog dedicated to the Dragonflies of France and elsewhere. Who hasn't felt in awe by their beauty? Census, discoveries, talks, explanations and quality photographs are the main objectives here!
To publish your dragonfly photos here, read the Publishing Conditions and contact Noushka at the link above.

13 mai 2016

A Broad Bodied Chaser Emerges

Broad bodied Chaser

Libellula depressa

Having missed a Broad bodied Chaser emerging a few days ago from the pond, I was keen to photograph this first for me with this species so knowing a few were in the pond, I kept checking to see if any looked like they would emerge soon. I was in luck and noticed an individual in the shallows which was well out of the water and even better, it had chosen one of my potted reeds that if necessary, could be removed to aid my photography. After taking a few shots, I planned to get up early this morning to see if I could photograph the emergence. Again the literature I have read suggested that they emerge early morning but not this one as when I checked last night just before 10pm, I could see it well up on the reeds and preparing to emerge. I wasn't quite expecting this so a rush later, I was in position with the camera and warned the neighbours that there would be some flashing from the garden (the camera, not me!) I quickly set up the tripod and using manual mode, ISO 400, speed set to 250 and in camera flash, I spent the next 2 hours photographing the spectacular emergence. I did feel a bit mad sitting in the garden near on midnight but on the other hand, totally privileged to witness this transformation while most slept unaware of what was happening. Once again, I was very pleased with the outcome of the photos and went to bed hoping that she would still be present early morning. This morning I was up at 6.45am where after getting dressed, I went outside where she had coloured up and once again, I took a few more photos of this stunning dragonfly. When I left for work, she was still at the pond but on arrival back home later, she had hopefully successfully made her first flight. Despite the long unsociable hours, what a sight to witness and photograph again and hopefully a few more will emerge from the pond in the next few days. Weather permitting although it doesn't look great for the weekend, I hope to venture out to maybe Westbere Lakes to see whats about and maybe grab a photo or two. 














Marc Heath

8 commentaires:

  1. Oooohhh Marc,
    First of all, many thanks for participating and posting this beautiful... I mean magnificent series of photos!
    Absolutely stunning!
    You managed to shoot it as it was just coming out of the water, a feat in itself, not to mention the time you spent at no time in the night!
    Your flash dosage is 'spot on' :) and I agree, this set of pics is perfect, you can be happy!!
    Luckily, it was still there in the morning and it looks so neat that one can only imagine it flew off to its new aerial life!
    Can't wait to see more...
    I will be checking on publications, but I might not participate much since I am moving.
    Enjoy your weekend

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    1. Many thanks Noushka. Hope the move goes well.

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  2. Wow wow wow! To parody the title of a 70's French film: "Your nights are more beautiful than our days." Amazing series, I believe one of the best ever published on this website! Thank you Marc! Greetings, M.

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    1. Many thanks Morikan for your kind words.

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  3. Magnifique série sue cette belle Libellula dépressa
    Cordialement
    Laurence

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  4. La technique "flash falloff" convient très bien pour ce genre de photos aussi.
    Magnifique.
    Voir ici: http://leblogphoto.net/2015/05/20/utilisez-la-technique-du-flash-falloff-pour-avoir-un-fond-noir-sur-vos-macrophotographies/

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  5. Hallucinant! Rien que la première photo, la larve sortant à peine de l'eau. Que dire, je suis sans voix et me délecte de cette série rare.

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  6. Hallucinant! Rien que la première photo, la larve sortant à peine de l'eau. Que dire, je suis sans voix et me délecte de cette série rare.

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